Frozen Bubbles

Frozen Bubbles
Have you ever wanted to pick a bubble up? You can if you know how to freeze them. Using the power of dry ice and carbon dioxide, you will create an invisible freezing layer for the bubble to float and freeze on.

Objectives:
  • To demonstrate the scientific principles of density, interference, semipermeability, and diffusion.


  • Experiment Details:
    • Type: Physical change
    • Grades 5-9
    • Difficulty of Project: Medium (Level 3)
    • Cost of Completing Project: $10
    • Approximate Time: Less than 10 minutes

What You'll Need
See Video Below!
  • Dry ice
  • Gloves (to handle dry ice)
  • Glass bowl (clear) or Cardboard box
  • Bubble solution with wand


Step-By-Step Procedure
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STEP 1:
Using gloves to protect your hands, place a chunk of dry ice in the bottom of the glass bowl or cardboard box.

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STEP 2:
Allow 4-6 minutes for the CO2 gas to accumulate in the bowl/box.
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step-3
STEP 3:
Blow bubbles into the container.
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STEP 4:
The bubbles that reach the dry ice will actually freeze.
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STEP 5:
Pick up your frozen bubbles!
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step-6
STEP 6:
Caution:

This experiment requires adult supervision. You'll need protective gloves and a pair of tongs to handle the dry ice. Do not touch the dry ice directly with your fingers or with any other unprotected part of your body! Because dry ice is so cold, it can severely damage your bare skin and even cause frostbite.
step-6
Observation & Conclusion
The dry ice is really solid carbon dioxide. The dry ice can freeze the bubbles for a short time until they begin to thin and pop. These frozen bubbles are strong enough to be held as the dry ice freezes them for a long enough time for examination.
Science Fair Questions
1. Would this experiment work if dish soap bubbles were used?

2. Would this experiment work if smoke from the dry ice got into the bubbles?

3. Would the bubbles stay frozen if they were placed in the freezer?

Video Demonstrations
Frozen Bubbles